Monday, February 20, 2006

Summary and reflection of Feb. 2006 Science and Children

My blog today is a summary and reflection of the February 2006 issue of Science and Children that I had to write for my science methods class.

Brenna Wade
February 20, 2006
Journal Review
Summary

I chose to read the February, 2006 edition of Science and Children. The magazine this month was all about mixing and matter. It contained a range of activities for children. There was an article, “Fun with Phase Changes”, that showed the basics of phase changing through role play, diagrams, and an investigation rubric. There were two articles on acids and bases; one showed how to incorporate safety into the lesson and the other was how to make homemade acid-base indicators from household items. Using modeling clay to help students understand properties was a very interesting article as well. Since most play dough is a suspension, it can become each stage of matter. Kids like to present their clay recipe to the class for homework because it is more fun than the typical textbook assignment. There was another engaging article called “Science S.O.S.” about a district in Ohio that changed their curriculum to that of a higher quality one, something that more districts need to do. The magazine also gave teacher resources which included a few trade books that should be introduced to the classroom, including I Took a Walk by Henry Cole and Secret Place by Ted Rand. There is a recipe for how to make slime as a way to encourage young chemists in the classroom, as well as an experiment with dissolving salt to find different solubility rates. It also gives a list of “NSTA recommends” with a pretty extensive list of reviews of different readers for the classroom and the grades that they would best work for, as well as a list of helpful websites that have been found. Lastly, there is a section for the Editor’s note, advertiser’s index, and a science calendar for the month of February.

Brenna Wade
February 20, 2006
Journal Review
Reflection

After reading the February 2006 edition of Science and Children I found that I really enjoyed it. I didn’t realize that there were magazines like this that helped teachers find new and exciting ways to teach science to the class and I hope that there are more magazines like this for all subjects. I liked how the magazine not only offered activities for the students, but also references for teachers like the lists of books and helpful websites.
I think that the articles were pretty easy to understand, other than the use of a few acronyms. Because the magazine flowed as nicely as it did I think that it was highly successful at more teachers incorporating the ideas into their own lessons. It chose things that all teachers have around them like cabbage for an acid-base indicator, and different kinds of salt for a solubility test. All of the articles were extremely useful and I am glad to know that there are magazines like this that will help me when I need to incorporate safety into the minds of the students at a young age (as it did with the article on including safety procedures in the third grade with the acid-base lesson).
I think that I would use this magazine quite frequently in my teaching in the future. I believe it gave a range of articles on many subjects in the science field, which allows you the convenience of not having to jump through many magazines to find the ideas it presents. From what I have seen in Science and Children so far, I would definitely subscribe to the magazine. I looked through a few others as well and I believe that the magazine focuses on topics useful to all science teachers and does so creatively.

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